Elenberg Fraser designs Lighthouse

LighthouseImage courtesy of Elenberg Fraser

Elenberg Fraser designs Lighthouse

This new 69 storey beacon on the northern edge of Melbourne’s CBD is a twisting helix that seems to defy the laws of physics. Appearing to turn on its trajectory, the building has no corners. How do you dissolve the corners of a skyscraper when that is where all sheer forces are normally resolved? We discovered the answer lies in traditional masonry techniques for turning corners using bricks.

LighthouseImage courtesy of Elenberg Fraser

This three-dimensional kaleidoscope not only twists and undulates on its axis but its façade is a moving object. The effect of constant motion is amplified by the iridescent contrasts of the goniochromism panels (which change colour depending on your perspective), which enhance reflectivity and create a coloured mosaic, refracting back the surrounding urban environment. You may have seen this paint effect on cars before, but never on a building!

LighthouseImage courtesy of Elenberg Fraser

Naturally, these external flourishes are not merely art, but also science, a considered urban response driven by the marriage of architecture and interior design. They create a form that addresses all aspects: maximising natural light and ventilation, whilst carefully balancing privacy and views. Each room is pronounced in the façade, offering the occupant exclusive panoramic views framed by bay windows, which look out beyond the immediate context. Together with the orientation of these windows, the interiors create an experience where apartments are as unique as their owners, as every room accentuates a different view out over the Melbourne landscape.

more. http://elenbergfraser.com

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