Interview: Chelsea Morgan

Chelsea MorganImage courtesy of Chelsea Morgan

Interview: Chelsea Morgan

Luca Curci talks with Chelsea Morgan during VISIONS – The Garden of Liquid Identities in Venice.
Chelsea Morgan is bilingual in English and Welsh fine artist living in the South Wales area. She is from Swansea (Walles) and is studied BA Sculpture: Casting, Carving and Construction at Carmarthen School of Art. To support her art practice, Chelsea works as a casual gallery attendant at Oriel Myrddin Gallery and assists with the running of the gallery shop, promoting the gallery as well as volunteering with workshops. As well as her job in the gallery, Chelsea works as a casual support worker, where she is able to assist vulnerable people in her community to help them live the lives they choose, and provides arts and crafts workshops for therapeutic purposes.

 

Chelsea MorganImage courtesy of Chelsea Morgan

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Luca Curci – What’s your background? What is the experience that has influenced your work the most?

Chelsea Morgan – I have always had a passion for art, but after school and college, I took a break from education and also moved to England where I got into care work where I was working with people every day. After a few years I moved back home to Wales, and ended up doing admin work. This for me drained all of my creativity and happiness, and after only a few months I decided it wasn’t right for me so I went back to college at Gower College Swansea, Llwyn-y-Bryn to do a foundation in Art and Design. This is where my love for art came back and the focus for my practice started to develop here. We looked at identity and the human form, and I really took to it. Then in Art college at Carmarthen School of art where I have just finished my BA Sculpture degree. This is where I continued to develop my practice, and started looking at the question, ‘What does it mean to be human?’ I think working in care had a big influence for me as I had the chance to talk to so many people about their life, and how everyone has a different story to tell, yet we’re all also very similar.

 

Chelsea MorganImage courtesy of Chelsea Morgan

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L.C. – What art themes do you pursue? What are your preferred subjects if any?

C.M. – I’m very interested in the theme of ‘Humanness and What does it mean to be human?’ I think I’m very drawn to this because it’s a theme that everyone can relate to. I’m very interested in other people and our differences and similarities.

 

L.C. – Did you style change over the years? How?

C.M. – The works displayed at Visions: the Garden of Liquid Identities, were works that I had created in my Second year of art college, where I was exploring the theme of ‘Skin’. This is a theme I’m very interested in, due to having eczema as I am very aware of my skin and what I put on it. I also explored the subject of ‘Humanness’ where I really gained an interest for life casting. There’s something really exciting about taking a direct cast from the body, and being able to see such detail from someone’s animated body, that is now on something so still and almost lifeless and ghostly. My work changed quite a bit in my third year of art college, still focusing on ‘what it means to be human’ but for my graduate show, I started looking at domestic objects. I am particularly interested in easily recognisable objects that most people have within their home, and how if those objects are changed so they are no longer functioning for their intended purpose, how do we then react to that object.

 

Chelsea MorganImage courtesy of Chelsea Morgan

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L.C. – What are you currently working on?

C.M. – Currently I’m still pursuing the theme of domestic objects and trying to change their purpose. I try to incorporate elements of silliness and surrealism into my work.

 

L.C. – How is being an artist nowadays?

C.M. – I have only just finished art college so I’m unsure at the moment, but I do think it’s quite exciting to be an artist. From speaking to other established artists though I get the impression that it can be quite tough, especially if you’re trying to make a living from solely your art. For me, I don’t want my art to be my job, as I know I will start to hate it, because it will become a chore, instead of a way to have fun and express myself, so as well as being an artist, I am studying to become an art teacher (where I still get to have fun creating art, except in a different setting).

 

Chelsea MorganImage courtesy of Chelsea Morgan

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L.C. – What’s the art tip you usually receive? Do visitors’ suggestions enrich yourself and your art?

C.M. – Definitely, I think getting feedback helps you understand your work from other people’s perspectives. They can give you ideas that you never thought, and from speaking to established artists, one of the most common tips is to apply to as many art competitions and residencies as possible, and to use online platforms like social media and websites to promote your work. It’s an exciting way to get your art out there if you’re unable to show your work in galleries right away.

 

Chelsea MorganImage courtesy of Chelsea Morgan

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L.C. – Do you agree with our vision of art and what you think about the theme of the festival?

C.M. – I do agree with it, I think art should be fluid because art is always changing and developing. The garden of liquid identities, I think was a really interesting theme as it gave artists the freedom to express themselves freely, and not be too constrained with a theme that was too specific.

 

L.C. – Do you think ITS LIQUID GROUP can represent an opportunity for artists?

C.M. – Definitely, Having the chance to have my work shown in Venice, was a great opportunity, even though I wasn’t able to visit to see my work set up, as it was during the last month of my degree, I still feel it’s been a great opportunity to showcase my work. ITSLIQUID GROUP is doing a great job at promoting artists through their website as well as giving them the chance to display their works in shows internationally, and I feel very grateful to have been a part of it.

 

Chelsea MorganImage courtesy of Chelsea Morgan

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L.C. – Did you feel comfortable cooperating with us?

C.M. – Yes, I’ve been able to ask questions through out the whole process from sending my work to Venice, to receiving images of my work in the show. Carmen in particular has been very helpful.

more. www.chelseamorganart.co.uk

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