Interview: Irene Curto


Interview: Irene Curto

Luca Curci talks with artist Irene Curto during Venice Experimental Cinema and Performance Art Festival exhibition in Venice on September 2015.

Irene Curto is an actress, director, teacher and multifaceted artist. The love for the art of acting led her to graduate early in the School of Theatre Avogaria, Venice and the International Theatre School Arsenal, in Milan, but her training includes in-depth study dance, music, painting and singing that deepens attending various conservatories and academies of Italy and Europe. Very young alongside, the study of the arts a research-Artistic Spiritual which flows in the need to experiment with new ways to express his vision of art and the theater. For several years she teaches courses and workshops theater around Italy with some outcome or performative. Irene is an expert among other things also techniques conscious trance, ritual magic, alchemy, bioenergetics, and hypnosis conscious.


Luca Curci – Can you talk about your personal experience in Venice? What did you think about the whole organization of the event, the artists’ selection, the communication management and opening nights?

Irene Curto – Well, actually, I’m not a real expert of this field, I can’t really express a valid opinion on the organization because I don’t organize these type of events. What I can say, though, is that I would have appreciated it if I had had better equipment (technically speaking) to work with. An improved audio system and lighting set would have made my performance much more striking, but surely this aspect will progress with time.

L. C. – What do you think about the collaboration between It’s LIQUID and Ca’ Zanardi/Venice Art House?

I. C. – Simply perfect. Ca’ zanardi is truly a welcoming place and all the staff makes you feel completely at ease, this is essential if one wishes to make the artist feel important and to create a professional work climate.


L. C. – Can you talk about the artwork you presented in Venice? How is it linked with the festival’s theme?

I. C. – Eodem originates from the depth of my psyche. It’s a scream, a call, an invocation to what lies beyond everything, or better, beyond our limited and dualistic perception of life. The festival’s theme was about SELF-IDENTITIES and my work would be an eulogy to the transcendent identity, a leap in the limitless, but also a cure, the solution and the dissolution of every mask. The actresses in the scene represent two sides of the same entity, which isn’t on stage, but can, though, be perceived. They don’t really share a psychological relationship, they simply research balance.


They seek for a dimension that is complete, which will allow them to recall the power of truth, of the absolute and of the transcendent. A man who recognizes his dark side is a complete, healthy and recovered man, for this darkness was just son of his false identity. Eodem isn’t an irrational dream, or a show set up just for an audience, which deals with something that interests our personal interiority. It’s a ferocious act of bravery that encourages to swim against the tide and to do what just few courageous people have the guts to do: observe from the outside towards the inside of oneself, to maybe receive as a reward a striking flash of grace and, in conclusion, a state of total unity.


L. C. What are you currently working on?

I. C. – I’m currently working on various projects. My main aim is to build up actors who, didactically, on stage are as “neutral” and as free from any sort of scholastic convention as possible. I’m not interested at all in acting as everyone knows it. Actually, I don’t regard anything that is mainstream interesting. Everything is relative, everything is and isn’t at the same time. I’m just a young artist who tries to live following the values that she tries to express through her art, but this is also the power of my revolution. An artistic revolution of the conscience. Mainly my research consists in organizing happening-workshops in which I try to lead my actors to a state that is similar to an aware trance; the actor must always observe himself, he must always be on the alert, for me  theatre is a big wakefulness. Without the aware trance, no kind of contact with the divine is possible. It’s scientific. In this very moment I’m working on a performance concerning the myth of Narcissus. Of all the fables and myths, I find this one has been the most badly interpreted of them all.


L. C. – What is art for you?

I. C. – Art should be a kind of blazing ferry that leads people from a shore of conscience to another, possibly a superior one. I like to think art is an evolutional futuristic dream for the human being, who can explore, wake up and be aware of the infinite transformative capacities he has within. In the Theatrical field this is becoming always more urgent. From over a century now isolated pioneers are screaming so loud for it that they barely have any voice left; a return of a sacred theatre, a cruel and total one, which has to be real, sanctified and objective is needed. Theatre could teach and train people in order to become limitless beings. I dream of a type of theatre that can also pass on an exact science, the science of the eternity and of the perfection. Every single person is responsible of his personal evolution, but there isn’t much difference between the word “universal” and “personal”. By transforming himself, an actor can revolutionize the entire world, because whatever is outside is actually fruit of the inside.

L. C. – What do you think about International ArtExpo and It’s LIQUID organizations? Do you think they can represent an opportunity for artists?

I. C. – It’s Liquid has a quite varied platform and I think that exposing projects there could be useful for emerging artists such as me. I’ve considered it, in fact, as a valid opportunity to reveal my work and make it public.

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