Interview: Kathy Rose

Interview: Kathy RoseImage courtesy of Kathy Rose

Interview: Kathy Rose

Luca Curci talks with Kathy Rose during the ANIMA MUNDI Festival 2017 in Venice.

Kathy Rose has received a Guggenheim in Performance Art in 2003, and well as numerous grants in Film, Video, Choregraphy, from the NEA, New York State Council for the Arts, etc. She is a Distinguished Alumni of the California Institute of the Arts. Kathy Rose has toured extensively in live performance throughout the United States and Europe, giving performances at the Museum of Modern Art, Kennedy Center, Serious Fun at Lincoln Center, Fondation Cartier pour l’art Contemporain, the Walker Art Center, The Kitchen, Institute of Contemporary Art in London, Baltimore Art Museum, Gulbenkian Foundation in Lisbon, Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art, etc. as well as performances in Geneva, Berlin, Helsinki, Amsterdam, Hiroshima, etc. Rose recently premiered a new piece “Opera of the Interior” at ANIMATOR 2015 in Poland.

 

Interview: Kathy RoseImage courtesy of Kathy Rose

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Her video installation works have been exhibited at the Victoria & Albert Museum, Aldrich Museum, etc. Rose’s recent videos have shown in Dance on Camera at Lincoln Center, American Dance Festival, Montage Video Dance/ Johannesburg, Black Maria Film festival, Ann Arbor Film Festival, INVIDEO 2008 Milan, São Carlos Videodance Festival, International Video Dance Festival – Le Breuil, Internacional VideoDanzaBA, Buenas Aires, DANSCAMDANSE Festival, Belgium, etc. Her video “Rapture of the Petals” was selected for the East West Art Awards World Tour for winners’ videos starting from Tokyo Berlin London BFI New York Shanghai Paris. Her video “Cubistimenco” screened in the Hiroshima Animation Festival in the program Best in the World. “The Unpainted Woman” showed in Rome, Italy in Its Liquid Experimental Video and Performance Art Festival at the BAU International Academy. Recent one-woman shows also include the Pompidou Center for “A Shaded View of Fashion Film Festival”, and at the EPOS Film Art Festival at the Tel Aviv Museum.

 

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Luca Curci – What is the message linked to the artwork you have shown in this exhibition? How is it connected to the theme of the entire festival?

Kathy Rose – The two videos I have shown recently with ANIMA MUNDI, “The Unpainted Woman”, and “Spirit of the Insects” are devoted to the surreal, the imaginable coming to earth. All of my work, both performance and video art, is a kind of salutation in recognition of the beauty and symmetry of the universe, therefore, an act of ritual in itself. The making of these videos becomes a ritualistic exercise, both in the act of production, and in the persona portrayed.

 

L.C. – What are you currently working on?

K.R. – I have just finished a new video, “Reverie of the Puppets”, in which the viewer is taken to a surreal landscape of great beauty that subtly shifts into a more hallucinogenic terrain. In general, with the pieces in the last few years, I embark on a work with no intent at all, largely motivated by my curiosity in following an image or feeling. I find that in shooting, and editing, things happen of themselves, which I am receptive to. It does not mean I am passive in my work. I am very active, like an alert fisherman. I put out the bait and there is a great skill in being intuitively aware of what is happening as a result, and how to proceed from there.

 

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L.C. – Are your artworks focused on a specific theme?

K.R. – I think most of my work addresses the human figure, movement and a sculptural or architectural environment. This can result in pieces which are related to screen dance, or fashion film. As a former animator, I find I am always engaged with this mindset, and feel as if I am crafting a jewel, altering time. I am also frequently working to mesh the real with the unreal, to create a new unreallity.

 

L.C. – How is being an artist nowadays?

K.R. – Being an artist is always challenging, but it is also what saves you. I find it very difficult to not be working on something. The act of doing the work, balances me and makes me whole. Regardless of what happens to the work, it is the act of making it that is the great savior and the real motivation.

 

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L.C. – What is the most challenging part about creating your artworks?

K.R. – I have found that getting an idea, is not enough. I have to try it in reality, and work with the medium. I must be guided by the precepts of reality to bring the project to birth. This always involves a kind of struggle, between my imaginative desires, and the reality I am working in – particuliarly with regard to light. There is no prediction for what light or projection will do. You have to simply try it.

 

L.C. – What’s the art tip you usually receive? Do visitors’ suggestions enrich yourself and your art?

K.R. – I usually show my work to a very select few, when I am creating it. It is a very delicate thing to expose the insular to the wrong understanding. Once it is released, there are a variety of reactions. I think we must be open to this, because everyone will be viewing your work from their own specific world, and will naturally have a very different perception.

 

Interview: Kathy RoseImage courtesy of Kathy Rose

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L.C. – Do you think Its LIQUID Group can represent an opportunity for artists?

K.R. – I think Its LIQUID is a wonderful opportunity for showing work, and in particular, I find the themes of the exhibitions to be very creative, open to a variety of interpretations. From Fractal Persona, to Rituals, Visions, etc., these are all very rich ideas, and it is a pleasure to fit into them.

 

L.C. – Would you suggest cooperating with us? What do you think about our services?

K.R. – I think it is a very productive thing to be showing amongst international artists, in a variety of settings. Yes, it’s true there is sometimes a cost to these entries, but there is definitely a value in letting others become familiar with your work, which can lead to many other types of exposure.

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