Interview with Maria Luisa Frisa for Fashion at IUAV – 2016

Interview with Maria Luisa Frisa for Fashion at IUAV - 2016
Credits: Mariano Barrientos

Interview with Maria Luisa Frisa for Fashion at IUAV – 2016

Luca Curci talks with Maria Luisa Frisa, Director of Fashion’s Design Courses at IUAV University – Venice, after the show Fashion at IUAV – 2016, which was an incredible success of audience and participation. The organization of the event, the enthusiasm of the staff (professors, curators, students) and the care of the fashion’s world toward the students was really impressive. 

 

Interview with Maria Luisa Frisa for Fashion at IUAV - 2016
Credits: Mariano Barrientos

Share on Pinterest








Submit

 

Luca Curci – Allow me to start by congratulating you and all the people involved in the show for the creation of this international environment and let me ask you: how much time is requested to organize an event so successful like that?

Maria Luisa Frisa – For the students, this is the event that they wait for since the beginning of their university path; it is the moment towards which they focused all their energy and hopes. As for the organisation of the whole ‘machine’, which concerns various aspects, absolutely everyone ends up being involved: tutors, students, friends. It all happens in the compressed and charged-up time of fashion: about three months.

 

Interview with Maria Luisa Frisa for Fashion at IUAV - 2016
Credits: Mariano Barrientos

Share on Pinterest








Submit

 

L.C. – Is it possible a logistical organization’s analysis of the event in terms of strenghts and weaknesses?

M.L.F. – I wouldn’t put it in terms of ‘strengths vs weaknesses’; I think that the very complexity of the event sets many challenges, that we did our best to overcome, and the good end result is what really talks about how the team has worked together. It was difficult to coordinate all the different activities that we planned for the two days, Venice is not an easy city in terms of following a strict timetable, but it is also a unique centre where to do unique things, and that was our goal: to propose something unexpected, which contributed to the academic discourse around fashion, bridging the gaps between university, designers, administrators, manufactures, historians and critics.

 

Interview with Maria Luisa Frisa for Fashion at IUAV - 2016
Credits: Mariano Barrientos

Share on Pinterest








Submit

 

L.C. – Which is the contribution of the fashion’s system to your activities?

M.L.F. – Even though a good knowledge of the fashion system is fundamental, we are a school, and we prefer to experiment instead of following a tested way. We believe that the ability to ‘design’ – to develop a detailed plan, to fix problems as they come, to be flexible and receptive, to fight for an idea – is fundamental for all the jobs one might take within the contemporary fashion industry. That’s why we try to teach a method that can be potentially applied to different situations and contexts: this leads students to be free in their approach to the fashion system and question the system itself, detecting what is wrong and having the will to fix it.

 

Interview with Maria Luisa Frisa for Fashion at IUAV - 2016
Credits: Mariano Barrientos

Share on Pinterest








Submit

 

L.C. – Talking about numbers how many students reach the final step among the all signed up for classes?

M.L.F. – It really depends on the group, but usually about 60 finish the last year, but only 16-18 get to take part to the show. Only the best hit the runway, and the choice is always very difficult, because after three years of preparation you clearly see that each student has developed a very personal voice. The graduation show though is designed as a choral moment, through which the course as a whole conveys its complexity, and not just a celebration of the singular designer: what has to come out is a balance between unity and difference. We tend to select consciously the collections that are more meaningful under various aspects: technical, aesthetic, material and conceptual.

 

Interview with Maria Luisa Frisa for Fashion at IUAV - 2016
Credits: Mariano Barrientos

Share on Pinterest








Submit

 

L.C. – What kind of training is request to the students to obtain a collection valid to be shown?

M.L.F. – Students are supposed to engage with every bit of the course, which has been structured in order to give them all the tools – technical as well as theoretical – to be able to develop every aspect of the design of a capsule collection. It is very much up to them to find their path between the different approaches to fashion design that are proposed in workshops, labs and classes, and the personality of each students comes out from a very personal mixture of these three sides of the curriculum: someone develops an incredible sensibility for textiles, someone else experiments with patterns, some others start from theory and work to materialise a concept.

 

Interview with Maria Luisa Frisa for Fashion at IUAV - 2016
Credits: Mariano Barrientos

Share on Pinterest








Submit

 

L.C. – Do the past and present IUAV courses give to the students the opportunity of a direct access to the fashion’s industry?

M.L.F – The course is very much constructed to give students all they need to access to the fashion system once they finish. The first semester of the last year of the BA is dedicated to internships: students have to find a position wherever they feel right for them, prepare the materials in order to apply for it, and finally they get a taste of what it is like working in fashion, be it as designers, editors, stylists. This means that from the second year they start a training that teaches them how to write a CV and a cover letter, how to graphically present their work in a portfolio, and also how to behave and talk in a job interview. After the BA, many students find relevant positions within the fashion world, while some others decide to complete their path with an MA, either here or elsewhere. In any case, we try to teach them to be flexible and accept challenges: sometimes you have to feel a bit uncomfortable in the beginning to get satisfaction.

 

Interview with Maria Luisa Frisa for Fashion at IUAV - 2016
Credits: Mariano Barrientos

Share on Pinterest








Submit

 

L.C. – During the year’s courses how much the students have the opportunity to test new technologies such as 3D printing, laser cutting, digital print, led technology and others frontiers?

M.L.F. – Unfortunately, due to costs and the fact that we are a public institution, the university is not in possess of the latest technologies. Despite that, we are keen on help in any way we can and encourage them to research what possibilities are around them. Innovation can come from the most unexpected places: a collaboration with an artisan, a DIY practice based on historical research, old techniques applied to new materials. This is a great school for the students’ future life as professionals, but also a good way to teach them how to connect with the know-how of our territory, which is invaluably rich in terms of materials and craftsmanship.

 

Interview with Maria Luisa Frisa for Fashion at IUAV - 2016Credits: Mariano Barrientos

Share on Pinterest








Submit

 

L.C. – Which are the current trends in fashion’s world?

M.L.F. – The fashion world is going faster and faster, I’m not sure if it is possible to talk about trends anymore. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing: we need to adjust our view and our vocabulary, in order to understand what is going on. What I see as fundamental now is the narrative: the ability of clothes to tell stories, linked to the history and identity of the brand, to the personality of the designer, to the needs and desires of consumers. It all comes down to a shared sensibility that translates in different sartorial and aesthetic directions.

 

Interview with Maria Luisa Frisa for Fashion at IUAV - 2016Credits: Mariano Barrientos

Share on Pinterest








Submit

 

L.C. – Which are the future expectations for the students?

M.L.F. – The students who presented their collection during the show now have to concentrate on their thesis. We usually ask them to reflect on their work and on their design process, in order to fully evaluate their growth in terms of abilities ad maturity. More generally, we cannot stress enough how much fashion is a discipline, and as a hands-on discipline it has to be constantly invigorated by new approaches and structures. We expect students to go on with their path without forgetting how complex, various and important fashion is for culture, identity and society.

 

Interview with Maria Luisa Frisa for Fashion at IUAV - 2016Backstage-Credits: Marco Forlin

 

Interview with Maria Luisa Frisa for Fashion at IUAV - 2016Backstage-Credits: Marco Forlin

 

Interview with Maria Luisa Frisa for Fashion at IUAV - 2016Backstage-Credits: Marco Forlin

 

Interview with Maria Luisa Frisa for Fashion at IUAV - 2016Backstage-Credits: Marco Forlin

 

Maria Luisa Frisa: Professor, critic and curator, she is Director of the BA Program in Fashion Design and Multimedia Arts at Iuav University of Venice. For Marsilio Editori she directs the Mode series dedicated to fashion ideas and figures. Her latest books are entitled Le forme della moda (Il Mulino, 2015) and Desire and Discipline. Designing Fashion at Iuav 2005-2015 (Marsilio, 2016). Her latest project is the exhibition and book entitled Bellissima. Italy and High Fashion 1945-1968 (Rome, MAXXI, November 2014-May 2015; Brussels, BOZAR, June-September 2015; Monza, Villa Reale, September 2015-January 2016; Fort Lauderdale, NSU Art Museum, February-June 2016).

Luca Curci: Italian artist, architect and designer, graduated in Architecture at the University of Camerino, Italy. In 2001 he founded International ArtExpo, an independent group of artists, which realized several international contemporary art events all-over the world. In 2004 he created It’s LIQUID, a communication platform with over 200.000 subscribers, dedicated to art, architecture and design. In 2006 he founded the architecture firm LUCA CURCI ARCHITECTS which has realized several projects of residential buildings, private houses, villas, restaurants and stores. Starting from 2015 he teaches Urban Planning and Interior Design at the Bahcesehir University (BAU) in the department of Rome. His artistic research is based on the concept of hybridization, analyzed through video-art, performing art and virtual art.

 

 

more. www.iuav.it

 

 

Share on Pinterest








Submit