ardeola | ITSLIQUID

ardeola

Design | August 17, 2019 |

Ardeola
Image courtesy of ardeola

ARDEOLA

The brand name ardeola (=pond heron bird in Latin) dates back to my childhood, when my grandparents had a sculpture that formed a very slender heron bird with its beam pointing up to the sky – all carved from one single piece of wood. This sculpture has later gone in my possession and I have chosen it to become the logo of my company as it expresses my devotion to wood. The sculpture has finally got broken, but the name remained.

Ardeola
Image courtesy of ardeola

Ercsényi Miklós, a Hungarian architect / product designer has launched this venture in 2014 and it functions as a shopwindow to his creations. Ardeola designs, manufactures and sells home decoration items and furniture pieces. All items are carefully designed and manufactured using high quality and precise technologies but many processes are made by hand.

Ardeola
Image courtesy of ardeola

The style ardeola pieces bear is a mixture of simplicity and organic effect. A good example is our wall clockHaystack’: it is composed of 60 uniform trapezoid shapes, still the final appearance is rather accidental. As a principle we follow the ‘less is more’ rule, however as for the final appearance we try to achieve is more than the minimal. We regularly revise our as a designs and update them – just in order to reach more appealing appearance.

Ardeola
Image courtesy of ardeola

The design processes always start with pencil sketches on paper, that are in many cases hand-drawn 3D figures of the imagined object. The best ideas go into computer, where the final drawings get prepared for the CNC machines. The main raw material that we use is basically high quality birch plywood. Most of our products are made of this material because it bears the wood grains (therefore it looks like a real wood) but still strong a thin enough. Along with the new manufacturing technologies that we adopt we also introduce and apply new materials that fits to the technologies seamlessly.

Ardeola
Image courtesy of ardeola

The manufacturing processes we use are computer aided precise technologies (like CNC laser cutting) and we constantly expand the range to find the best that fits to our latest designs. Aside from these technology driven processes we combine the manufacturing with handmade phases: pilishing, painting and the final assembly is always made by hand.

more. www.ardeola.hu

Ardeola
Image courtesy of ardeola

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