Richard Avedon. Murals and portraits | ITSLIQUID

Richard Avedon. Murals and portraits

Art | July 17, 2014 |

Richard AvedonRichard Avedon, Andy Warhol and Members of the Factory, 30 October 1969

Richard Avedon: Murals and portraits

Richard Avedon (1923–2004) is widely regarded as one of the most important and influential fashion photographers of the second half of the twentieth century. The exhibition at Museum Brandhorst marks the first presentation of works by Richard Avedon from the holdings of the Udo and Anette Brandhorst Foundation. Right from the start of his career, his theatrically staged yet strikingly dynamic images of the key fashion trends of the time captured and defined the “look” of the moment.

Richard AvedonRichard Avedon, Allen Ginsberg and Peter Orlovsky, New York, 30 December 1963

The presentation at Museum Brandhorst skirts this fairly well known aspect of Avedon’s oeuvre which has already been documented in numerous exhibitions. Instead it focuses on other areas of the photographer’s work. In addition to straightforward fashion shoots, which secured the financial basis of his practice, Avedon was commissioned to produce portraits of public figures to illustrate magazine articles about them. The ensemble of these portraits forms a fascinating panorama of the cultural and political elites of America. Another early interest was the everyday life of anonymous people in the streets of southern Italy and New York.

Richard AvedonRichard Avedon, Allen Ginsberg’s family, New Jersey, 3 May 1970

Against the backdrop of America’s social and political upheavals, from 1969 to 1971 Avedon embarked on the production of four large-scale photographic murals that occupy a key position in the history of the medium. Photographed in black and white, the shadowless group portraits are notable for their rigorous clarity and unflinching objectivity that seem to undermine the aesthetic autonomy of the works, so that they are not instantly perceived as art. Their powerful impact is primarily the result of the intensity and immediacy of the confrontation between the viewer and the photographs – or rather the people shown in them.

more. www.museum-brandhorst.de

Are you an artist, architect, designer? Would you like to be featured on ITSLIQUID platform? Send an e-mail to info@itsliquid.com or fill the form below

RELATED POSTS


Meller

Fashion | January 4, 2021

Meller is a collective of creative minds, art lovers and trend followers. We were born in 2014 to transform the latest trends into eyewear and watches. We focus on the design and quality materials to offer unique and affordable accessories. Through our path, we have launched 4 product lines, sunglasses (44 collections), blue light glasses (14 collections), watches (11 collections) and jewelry (9 collections). Read more


Mondrian and De Stijl

Art | December 30, 2020

Holland at the beginning of the last century was the birthplace of a totally new form of art, an abstract art based on strict relations between rectangular forms, color planes, and straight lines. In October 1917, during the First World War, a group of young artists in neutral Holland joined forces to create a magazine. Called De Stijl, it presented and promoted this new, innovative art. Read more


The Fullness of Color: 1960s…

Art | December 28, 2020

The Fullness of Color: 1960s Painting reflects the museum's historical engagement with this artistic period, and, while far from comprehensive, seeks to provide a point of departure for future collection growth that may further illustrate the richness of 20th-century painting. Read more


Sweet Land of Funk

Art | December 28, 2020

Sweet Land of Funk, currently on view on the third floor of the Museum's Katz Wing for Modern Art, explores the art movements of 1950s San Francisco. A survey of more than 20 works from the Museum's modern and contemporary art collections by Funk and figurative Bay Area artists, including Viola Frey, Jay DeFeo, Bruce Nauman, Richard Diebenkorn, and Manuel Neri, the special installation creates a sense of the City by the Bay, Oakland, Berkeley, and beyond during the storied period of Beat poets and bohemians, of Haight and "Howl," and of counter-culture that questioned conformity, ongoing military conflicts, the disparity of wealth, and other social issues that would fuel the revolution of the Baby Boomer generation. Read more


Sign up for our Newsletter.

Enter your email to receive our latest updates!