Central Embassy | ITSLIQUID

Central Embassy

Architecture | October 27, 2017 |

al_a_central-embassy-hufton_crow_n5_previewImage courtesy AL_A

Central Embassy
Bangkok, Thailand
Status: Completed 2017

 

Central Embassy brings a distinguishing new silhouette in the city, one that opens out both to the street and the skyline, and extends an invitation to the people of Bangkok and the world beyond.

 

al_a_central-embassy-hufton_crow_n2_previewImage courtesy of AL_A

 

Located within the former gardens of the British Embassy, along Ploenchit Road, Bangkok’s primary commercial artery, the 1.5 million sq ft mixed use project merges a seven storey luxury retail podium and a 27 storey five star Park Hyatt hotel tower into a cohesive, architectural entity.

 

al_a_central-embassy-hufton_crow_n9_previewImage courtesy of AL_A

 

The hotel and shopping mall are bound together using the notion of a continual looped form to give a more intuitive merging between plinth and tower and between the programmes. The continuity of the tower line appears to break down the volume of the mass of the plinth, creating a structure that is asymmetrical in all dimensions.

 

al_a_central-embassy-hufton_crow_n16_previewImage courtesy of AL_A

 

The openness of the form embraces the city and sets up reciprocal views, with a series of terraces outside and balconies within to see and be seen. The elevated form that rises from the podium wraps around two vertical light wells, opening up internal spaces to reveal stepped terraces, and dividing hotel functions: private guest-related programmes face the gardens of Lai Nert Park, while the hotel bar, reception lounge and sky terrace face the city centre.

 

al_a_central-embassy-hufton_crow_n19_previewImage courtesy of AL_A

 

Uniting traditional craftsmanship with digital design technologies, the design of the façade builds on Thailand’s tradition of intricate pattern making. The exterior is clad in aluminium tiles, each with two surfaces to reflect both the chaos of the city and the sky itself. Creating a dynamic pattern in response to external conditions, the distribution of tiles creates a moiré-like effect, articulated by the play of light and reflection along the varying profiles.

 

more. www.ala.uk.com

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