CONCRETE MATTERS | ITSLIQUID

CONCRETE MATTERS

Art | April 9, 2018 |

CONCRETE MATTERSImage courtesy of Moderna Museet

CONCRETE MATTERS
Moderna Museet, Stockholm, Sweden
From February 24 to April 13, 2018

For a few vigorous decades in the mid-20th century, artists in the rapidly-growing cosmopolitan cities of Montevideo, Caracas, Buenos Aires, São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro were exploring concrete art. This exhibition highlights the period when concretism – and thus, the boundaries of art – were being examined. The exhibition Concrete Matters also presents the emerging Brazilian neo-concretism. In the late-1950s, artists such as Lygia Clark, Lygia Pape and Helió Oiticica challenged the concept of the work of art as a static object.

CONCRETE MATTERSImage courtsey of Moderna Museet

In the mid-1940s, movements in Argentina began to reinterpret and develop the European concrete art initiated by the Dutch artist Theo van Doesburg in Paris in 1930. These artists said that figurative, representational art tended to “dampen the cognitive energy of man, distracting him from his own powers”. The concretists rejected the illusionism that artists had used over the centuries to create a three-dimensional pictorial space on the two-dimensional surface of the canvas. Instead, they proposed that people should be surrounded by real things, not illusions. Concrete art was the path forward, since it ”accustoms man to a direct relationship with things and not with the fiction of things”.

CONCRETE MATTERSImage courtsey of Moderna Museet

Over the ensuing decades, concretism was interpreted and reinterpreted by artists in Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay and Venezuela. Despite obvious visual similarities, their works are also partly contradictory in innumerable ways with regard to the artists’ ideas and intentions. Countless artist factions were formed, broke up and reunited in the slightly more than four decades covered by this exhibition. Like the early-20th century avant-garde movements, these groups also occasionally presented utopian visions in texts and manifestos, which were distributed as flyers or printed in their own magazines, or published indaily newspapers.

CONCRETE MATTERSImage courtsey of Moderna Museet

Concrete Matters presents some 70 works made from the 1930s to the 1970s in Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay and Venezuela, and is based on works in the collection Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros.

more. www.modernamuseet.se

Are you an artist, architect, designer? Would you like to be featured on ITSLIQUID platform? Send an e-mail to info@itsliquid.com or fill the form below

RELATED POSTS


INTERVIEW:CENGIZ YATAGAN

Interviews | October 15, 2020

Cengiz Yatağan was born in 1968. He finished his education in Istanbul before moving to Australia, where he was involved in businesses for two years. He has worked in architecture, construction and IT sectors. After specializing in renovation of historic buildings, he focused on arts. Lives and works in Istanbul. Read more


INTERVIEW: HEIKE-ANGELA BALTRUWEIT

Interviews | October 12, 2020

I am looking for abstract compositions in my surroundings to capture them photographically. The objects and situations are neither changed, arranged nor manually illuminated, nor are they subsequently edited on the computer, even the detail is identical to the shot. All pictures are 'Pure Photography'. I see my surroundings as a 'natural exhibition space'. I find works of art on the pavement, on building walls, in the water and in factory buildings. These works of art are fixations of the moment and therefore difficult to reproduce. A different angle of view, a changed incidence of light, and the colours, bizarrely changed forms have disappeared. Read more


Waiwai

Fashion | October 12, 2020

Growing up founder and designer Sasha Arkhipova was exposed to the artistic process from an early age. Brought up in a family of creatives she was surrounded by art, fashion, architecture and alternative music as she developed her passion for form and material exploration. During her formative years she spent most of her spare time absorbing the curiosities of her native Russia attending various galleries, exhibits and watching classic and progressive films. Read more


Why Is It Hard to…

Art | October 12, 2020

This summer MO Museum in Vilnius opens a new exhibition Why Is It Hard to Love?. It is curated by innovative Dutch multimedia artist and director Saskia Boddeke and one of the most original filmmakers of our times Peter Greenaway. Read more


Sign up for our Newsletter.

Enter your email to receive our latest updates!