Henry Moore: Wunderkammer – Origin of Forms at Gagosian London | ITSLIQUID

Henry Moore: Wunderkammer – Origin of Forms at Gagosian London

Art | January 28, 2015 |

Henry MooreHenry Moore working in the Maquette Studio, 1960. Photo: John Hedgecoe. Courtesy of The Henry Moore Foundation

“Henry Moore: Wunderkammer – Origin of Forms” at Gagosian London

Gagosian London is pleased to present “Henry Moore: Wunderkammer – Origin of Forms,” curated by Richard Calvocoressi, Director of The Henry Moore Foundation. A giant of modern sculpture, Moore engaged the abstract, the surreal, the primitive and the classical in vigorous corporeal forms that are as accessible and familiar as they are avant-garde. His large-scale works celebrate the power of organic imagery at a time when traditional representation was largely eschewed by the vanguard art establishment. Their overwhelming physicality and forceful presence promotes a charged relation between sculpture, site, and viewer.

Henry MooreHenry Moore, Relief No.1, 1959. Courtesy of The Henry Moore Foundation

This special exhibition explores the origins and processes behind Moore’s sculptures by recreating his maquette studio at Perry Green – now home to The Henry Moore Foundation – at the Davies Street gallery. His Wunderkammer of natural stones, shells, bones, animal skulls, and other found objects will be presented alongside the drawings and sculptural maquettes that they inspired, demonstrating the metamorphosis from nature to sculpture, from inanimate object to human or animal form, that was the impetus of his oeuvre.

Henry MooreHenry Moore, Upright Motive No. 9, 1979. Courtesy of Phil Masters

In counterpoint to this intimate exhibition drawn from Moore‘s working processes, two monumental bronze sculptures Relief No. 1 (1959) and Upright Motive No. 9 (1979) will be installed in Berkeley Square, Mayfair, from February 9–May 29, 2015. Over two metres high, Relief No.1 (1959) grew out of the maquettes Moore made in 1955 for his brick Wall Relief, commissioned by the Bouwcentrum in Rotterdam. Four of these maquettes are included in the present exhibition. Moore wished to emphasise the forceful, projectional qualities of relief as opposed to using it pictorially, as in the narrative friezes of Renaissance sculpture.

Henry MooreHenry Moore, Wall Relief No.1, Rotterdam, 1955. Courtesy of Maurice Dumas

Thus the head and shoulders, torso, and legs of the figure are composed in three distinct parts, with the protruding umbilicus and receding chest exaggerated for expressive strength. The Upright Motives also have their origin in Moore‘s maquettes for the Bouwcentrum Wall Relief. They are among his most powerful and affecting monuments – part biomorph, part machine; among many other things, a fusion of totem pole and crucifix. Upright Motive No.9 (1979), based on a maquette of 1968, is the most figurative in the series, in which an architectural column appears to metamorphose into a female form.

more. www.henry-moore.org | www.gagosian.com

Are you an artist, architect, designer? Would you like to be featured on ITSLIQUID platform? Send an e-mail to info@itsliquid.com or fill the form below

RELATED POSTS


Charlotte Posenenske. Work in progress

Art | November 15, 2020

Mudam Luxembourg - Musée d'Art Moderne Grand-Duc Jean presents Charlotte Posenenske: Work in Progress. The exhibition traces the evolution of the pioneering work of Charlotte Posenenske (b. 1930, Wiesbaden; d. 1985, Frankfurt am Main) during the years 1956-68, a short but prolific period when she was active as an artist. Read more


Uncanny Valley: Being Human in…

Art | November 13, 2020

What are the invisible mechanisms of current forms of artificial intelligence (AI)? How is AI impacting our personal lives and socioeconomic spheres? How do we define intelligence? How do we envision the future of humanity? As technological innovation continues to shape our identities and societies, the question of what it means to be or remain human has become the subject of fervent debate. Taking advantage of the de Young museum's proximity to Silicon Valley, Uncanny Valley: Being Human in the Age of AI arrives as the first major exhibition in the US to explore the relationship between humans and intelligent machines through an artistic lens. Read more


INTERVIEW: DAVID PHOENIX

Interviews | November 12, 2020

"More than a job, this is my purpose. Sensing, understanding, expressing are the guidelines that have led me to what you will witness in my artwork. As per my personality, my art is a stylistic fusion of encounters and opportunities. Starting with puntinism and arriving to Action Painting and Pouring Painting, I have found my "colourful" way of expressing myself. Passion, a desire to live render my artwork my presentation card. Every single brush stroke, chromatic flexion, line of colour exploded on the canvas, is a part of me." Read more


INTERVIEW: EVA MARC’H

Interviews | November 6, 2020

Eva Marc'h began painting at the age of 19 with no artistic training. Her very first paintings revealed the qualities of an inherent artistic gift, including perspective, depth, balance, and especially, color. Painting self-taught for ten years, she was free to explore her talent, allowing for only the expression of her unconscious to guide her many and varied creations. By 2000, she was inspired to participate in formal art study workshops at the School of Fine Arts in Paris, where she learned practice drawing and many other different techniques of painting to enhance her works. Read more


Sign up for our Newsletter.

Enter your email to receive our latest updates!