Hookah Bar Nargile by KMAN Studio | ITSLIQUID

Hookah Bar Nargile by KMAN Studio

Design | April 12, 2016 |

Hookah Bar Nargile by Kman StudioImage courtesy of Tsvetomir Dzhermanov

Hookah Bar Nargile by KMAN Studio

Designers at KMAN Studio, were asked by their clients in Sofia, Bulgaria, to create a space for their bar that was a bold contemporary interpretation of a traditional hookah bar. To do so, they looked for references in the “one thousand and one nights” stories, and in the intricate geometric patterns adorning classical islamic architecture.

 

Hookah Bar Nargile by Kman StudioImage courtesy of Tsvetomir Dzhermanov

 

Enjoying hookah is a social rather than individual experience, in which friends share a pipe around a table over hours-long conversations, board games, or simply enjoy some peace and silence together. Thus, the main focus was naturally the lounge area, around which a custom 3D printed sculptural ceiling wraps gently and provides careful yet fluid balance between privacy and communication.

 

Hookah Bar Nargile by Kman StudioImage courtesy of Tsvetomir Dzhermanov

 

Generated by 7456 wooden cylinders, the shape is in constant play with the ground floor following the curvatures on the ground and emphasizing the contours. The furniture is in organic shapes, allowing for simple and intuitive reconfiguration depending on the size of the group and their desire to either isolate themselves or stay in contact with the rest of the space.

 

Hookah Bar Nargile by Kman StudioImage courtesy of Tsvetomir Dzhermanov

 

They also defined the entrance as a separate volume, forming a buffering zone between the noisy street and the abstract magical atmosphere inside. At night, the space becomes somewhat magical, with lanterns hanging above organically shaped seats. The result is an elegant and welcoming space where traditional patterns play with modern technologies and design techniques.

 

 

more. kmanstudio.com

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