Interview: Piotr Krysiak | ITSLIQUID

Interview: Piotr Krysiak

Interviews | September 27, 2016 |

Interview: Piotr Krysiak Image courtesy of Piotr Krysiak 

Interview: Piotr Krysiak 

Luca Curci talks with Piotr Krysiak during FRAGMENTED IDENTITIES of BORDERS festival in Venice on August 2016.  Piotr Krysiak (1982, Poland) graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts in Kraków. He also studied at the Ecole Superieure des Beaux-Arts in Toulouse, France. The works of Krysiak are mainly a pictorial record of the passing of life, its duration, complexity and fluctuation. Simultaneously to his recording of time, Krysiak creates paintings imitating reality, or undertaking the subject of change, ambiguity or temporariness.The works of Piotr Krysiak have been displayed in solo and group exhibitions, including ’10th Triennial of Small-Size Painting’, Wozownia Art Gallery, Torun, Poland (2016); ‘Borders’ International Art and Architecture Festival, Venice (2016); ‘Dave Brown Projects 12th Semiannual Competition’, USA (2016); ‘Chashama Gala’, 4 Times Square, New York City (2016); ‘Piotr Krysiak – Painting’ (solo), Brick-5, Vienna (2016); ‘Salted Candy’, Nowa Gallery, Poznan (2011); ‘II Triennial of Contemporary Polish Painting’, BWA Rzeszow and BWA Zamosc (2011); ‘New things’ (solo), Museum in Bielsko-Biala (2010). His works are in the collection of the Museum in Bielsko-Biala (PL), Dave Bown Collection (USA), as well as in private collections.

 

Interview: Piotr Krysiak Image courtesy of Piotr Krysiak 

 

Luca Curci – In which way the artwork presented in our exhibition is connected with the festival’s theme? What do you think about the concept of this festival? 

Piotr Krysiak – I decided to take part in Fragmented Identities event which is a part of the Borders Festival mainly because my latest paintings are largely about fragments. About these little parts of ourselves like thoughts or feelings that influence our life. The randomness of their origin serve as a basis for subsequent decisions I make while painting. All these elusive reflections and sensations impact the formation of shapes and directions the tiny particles of paint take. The recorded fragments of time, the form they have taken, in turn, affect the emerging new thoughts. This process is mutual, like in life.

 

Interview: Piotr Krysiak Image courtesy of Piotr Krysiak 

 

L.C. – Did your style change over the years? How?

P.K. – My artistic practice has been transforming ever since I have started it. It is still changing, although I feel that the painting records I am doing now are the most advanced and the closest to my perception of things around.
L.C. – What is the message linked to the artwork you have shown in this exhibition? How is it connected to the theme of the entire festival?
P.K. – It isn’t my intention to link any messages to my latest paintings. I am not necessarily into art which leads missions or is the vehicle of direct artist’s messages.

 

Interview: Piotr Krysiak Image courtesy of Piotr Krysiak 

 

L.C. – What is the most challenging part about creating your artworks?
P.K. – Undisturbed connection with the process of painting. It can be a single thought that can break it.
L.C. – What was the best advice given to you as an artist?

P.K. – There is something like following your gut, your intuition, and in that case taking or not taking advices doesn’t really seem to be relevant. I rather follow my instincts.

L.C. – Did you feel comfortable cooperating with us and about our services? Is there something more we can provide to artists?

P.K. – I contacted your festival’s staff a couple of times and I received answers to almost all questions. I think it might help the artists if you provided an option to send back the artworks by regular post. Main courier companies offer very high prices for their services which can be daunting while considering participation in the festival.

 

Interview: Piotr Krysiak Image courtesy of Piotr Krysiak 

Interview: Piotr Krysiak Image courtesy of Piotr Krysiak 

 

Interview: Piotr Krysiak Image courtesy of Piotr Krysiak 

 

more. piotrkrysiak.com

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