James Rosenquist – Leslie Sacks Contemporary | ITSLIQUID

James Rosenquist – Leslie Sacks Contemporary

Art | September 27, 2012 |

James Rosenquist, Dog Descending a Staircase, 1982. Lithograph and intaglio, 42 x 70 inches. Edition of 33

James Rosenquist

Exhibition Dates: September 29 – November 10, 2012

Leslie Sacks Contemporary is pleased to announce an exhibition of prints by world-renowned New York artist James Rosenquist. This exhibition will include a suite of six prints from 1999, one large-scale work from 1982, and Rosenquist’s latest print, which was completed in 2011. The exhibition follows the recent installation of F-111, 1964-65 at the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Rosenquist is known for creating large-scale works, which derive from his early career as a commercial billboard painter. In the 1960s, the artist began to incorporate imagery from billboards into his paintings. Rosenquist was considered a pop artist because of this advertising imagery, however his works are more concerned with political statements and formal artistic investigations. In comparison to Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein, Rosenquist possessed a virtuosic talent for rendering imagery by hand. He was interested in blending color and grayscale, and creating depth in his massive paintings.

In 1982, Rosenquist worked with the preeminent print atelier Universal Limited Art Editions to create a lithograph, which memorialized his 1979 masterpiece Dog Descending a Staircase. Immense in scale (40 x 70 inches), the lithograph is a play on Marcel Duchamp’s infamous Nude Descending a Staircase, 1912. Rosenquist’s version features juxtaposed objects that seemingly bear no relation to one another yet come together to form a cohesive visual and psychological narrative. Snapshots of industrial machinery, a doll’s head and the titular dog descending a staircase, are stand-ins for the figures of man, woman and machine. By taking these identifiable images, so familiar to the viewer, and reassembling them in an unfamiliar, abstract composition, Rosenquist imbues the objects with a new meaning that comments on contemporary American society.

In 1999, Rosenquist created The Speed of Light series, which marked a departure from advertising imagery and instead explored the artist’s ongoing fascination with space and time. Referencing the phenomena of the solar system, these works feature increasingly elaborate compositions. Images overlay and interlock to form a chaotic abstract landscape. Rosenquist has likened the imagery to the altered view of the universe that one would get if traveling at the speed of light.

The Memory Continues but the Clock Disappears, 2011 is Rosenquist’s most recent edition. The piece is a framed lithograph that features an etched, hand-colored, rotating mirror emblazoned with the numbers of a clock. The work stems from a series that Rosenquist calls The Hole in the Center of Time, a set of works inspired by a pivotal visit the artist made to a cave in Spain. Leaving Rosenquist with an eerie feeling, the experience provoked a body of work dealing with the theme of perception -both in terms of self and the cosmos. The piece signifies an older Rosenquist who is concerned with the passage of time and is reflecting on his own life narrative. It poses questions about how space and time shift in an evolving universe and how we evolve simultaneously.

Leslie Sacks Contemporary
Bergamot Station
2525 Michigan Avenue, Space B6
Santa Monica, CA 90404

Tel: (310) 264.0640
Fax: (310) 264.0740
info@lscontemporary.com
www.lesliesackscontemporary.com

Are you an artist, architect, designer? Would you like to be featured on ITSLIQUID platform? Send an e-mail to info@itsliquid.com or fill the form below

RELATED POSTS


INTERVIEW: CECILIA IBETH ÁLVAREZ MORENO

Interviews | September 24, 2020

I was born in Mexico City, my parents were both plastic artists, so artistic expression is in my blood, it is part of me, beyond what academic study can do for anyone. My mother said I was born bored. I am a person who gets bored easily with routine. What I paint, must necessarily take me to a world full of fantasy where there is always an explanation for my reality. Read more


INTERVIEW: MELANIE MOLLO

Interviews | September 24, 2020

Feelings flow freely into the soul, without control, as the colors on the canvas become one with it. That it is happiness, sadness, love, passion, anger, they dominate us and dominate our actions. Like the flow of a river into the sea, they get lost in the immensity of our being, regenerating itself in the latter, and then share their new life as a drop and source of feeling. This underlines the cyclical nature without a beginning or an end. Feelings are part of us forging our character. Read more


BOCHNER BOETTI FONTANA

Art | September 23, 2020

Curated by Mel Bochner in collaboration with Magazzino Italian Art, This Special Exhibition Examines Parallel Artistic Movements in the 1960s and 1970s in the U.S. and Italy through the artwork of Bochner, Alighiero Boetti, and Lucio Fontana. Cold Spring, NY – August 24, 2020 – This fall, Magazzino Italian Art opens a special exhibition examining the formal, conceptual, and procedural affinities in the work of Mel Bochner, Alighiero Boetti, and Lucio Fontana. Curated by Bochner in collaboration with Magazzino, the exhibition marks the first presentation to consider the American artist’s extensive, yet overlooked, engagement with the practices of Fontana and Boetti, as well as with Italian art at large. Bochner Boetti Fontana offers, through the artist’s perspective, a number of resonances between his work and that of the Italian and Italian-Argentine artists: an exploration of systems, language, and materials; and a sense of irony and humor, often and especially shared by Arte Povera and Conceptualism, as all these works opened the work of art onto the space of display. Read more


INTERVIEW: ELSA EGON

Interviews | September 21, 2020

"Art represents for me a 'ligne de vie'. I have been painting since my 15 years: since then, artistic practice has accompanied all my experiences as a girl, woman, mother. My only safety net in the most difficult situations, today represents the way to seek beauty in the objects and materials we use every day. I often work starting from a material that already carries a story in it, because it has been found, extracted and reused. It may perhaps be recognized by the people who had it in their hands. Somehow, it tells a collective story, piecing together, to establish bonds, but at the same time fixing my experiences." Read more


Sign up for our Newsletter.

Enter your email to receive our latest updates!