Mark Rothko: Works on Paper 1941 – 1947 | ITSLIQUID

Mark Rothko: Works on Paper 1941 – 1947

Art | April 28, 2014 |

Mark RothkoMark Rothko, No. 14, c. 1949-1951. Oil on canvas

Mark Rothko: Works on Paper 1941 – 1947

New York – Pace Gallery is pleased to present Mark Rothko: Works on Paper 1941 – 1947, an exhibition of more than 30 works on paper by the seminal artist. The exhibition will be on view at 32 East 57th Street from May 2 to June 21, 2014. This is the twelfth Rothko exhibition presented by Pace since 1978 featuring works from the artist’s estate and heirs. It is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue with an essay by James Lawrence, a critic and historian specializing in postwar and contemporary art.

Mark RothkoMark Rothko, Untitled, 1969. Acrylic on canvas

Executed in watercolor and in some cases ink, graphite, or charcoal on paper, nearly all of the works range from approximately 20 x12” to 41 x 27” in size, and a few have painting on both the recto and verso. Mark Rothko: Works on Paper 1941 – 1947 presents works from a rich period of experimentation and innovation. As Lawrence notes in his catalogue essay, Rothko’s approach “shifts among layering, modeling of contours, and expressive scribbling that allows the sweeping tonal fields to serve as form, ground, or atmosphere“.

Mark RathkoMark Rothko, No. 15, 1957. Oil on canvas

He later adds that by the mid-1940s, Rothko’s “allegiance to conventions of spatial order in painting had withered to the point where depth and contours could barely be detected, much less interpreted… Rothko used the fluidity of watercolor to erode distinctions and diminish resolution. The results convey realms of emergence or submersion“. None of the work in the exhibition bears a title as, throughout the period of the exhibition, Rothko sought a visual expression of deeply psychological and spiritual states. During this highly experimental period, Rothko explored a wide range of palettes, from soft grays and blues offset by muted reds to vibrant blues and reds to heavy browns and dark grays.

Mark RothkoMark Rothko, Untitled (Multiform), 1948. Oil on canvas

The drawings on view suggest human figures and loosely defined biomorphic shapes that, like watercolor, bleed into their surroundings, though his technique was highly varied. “Throughout the watercolors from this period”, Lawrence writes, “the range of techniques that Rothko employed proliferated dramatically. Varieties of scribbling, graffiti, dry brushing, scraping, soaking, rubbing, and techniques for which no name exists, emerged and thrived”.

more. www.pacegallery.com | www.markrothko.org

Are you an artist, architect, designer? Would you like to be featured on ITSLIQUID platform? Send an e-mail to info@itsliquid.com or fill the form below






    RELATED POSTS


    FEATURED ARTIST: XIAODONG MA

    Art | May 21, 2024

    Chicago-based Industrial designer and visual artist Xiaodong Ma was born in Nanjing, China, in 1991. After receiving his MFA from the California College of the Arts in 2019, he has been exploring the intersection between art and design for years with an unwavering obsession with the simplicity and intricacy of nature and man-made. Read more


    SOULS OF VENICE

    Art | May 20, 2024

    "Anime di Venezia – Souls of Venice" is the new creation of Italian-American artist Lorenzo Quinn, which will be on display in Venice from 20th April to 15th September 2024, commemorating the 700th anniversary of Marco Polo’s death and coinciding with the 60th Art Biennale. Comprised of 15 statues made of a metallic mesh weave of thousands of links, the installation presents some of the most significant ‘Souls’ that have lived over the centuries of the Venetian Republic, traditionally known as La Serenissima. Read more


    FEATURED ARTIST: NEIL SHAPIRO

    Art | May 19, 2024

    We are excited to introduce Neil Shapiro, who uses photography to capture the magnificence of nature. To achieve this, Shapiro shoots "wide open" for a shallow depth of field, emphasizing focal points. His photographs are direct and crisp, leaving no room for ambiguity. Read more


    SEEING FOREST: SINGAPORE PAVILION AT…

    Art | May 17, 2024

    As visitors enter Seeing Forest, they step into a mysterious, forested zone that exists both in the imagination and in Singapore. In this in-between space called the secondary forest - a threshold between old-growth or primary forest and developed areas, between urban and wild, invention and reality - artist Robert Zhao Renhui invites us to consider a complex web of human and non-human co-existence. Seeing Forest encourages visitors to explore the ways in which urban design can shape the natural world, and vice versa, resulting in a new ecosystem of migrant species that echoes the histories, trajectories and makeup of a city’s human population. Read more


    Sign up for our Newsletter.

    Enter your email to receive our latest updates!