Christodoulos Panayiotou: “Two Days After Forever” at Venice Biennale | ITSLIQUID

Christodoulos Panayiotou: “Two Days After Forever” at Venice Biennale

Art | June 15, 2015 |

Christodoulos Panayiotou at Venice BiennaleImage courtesy of Christodoulos Panayiotou, 2015

Christodoulos Panayiotou: “Two Days After Forever” at Venice Biennale

Two Days After Forever” is a solo presentation by artist Christodoulos Panayiotou, taking as one of its starting points the invention of archaeology and its instrumental role in forging the master narrative of history. It is a discursive proposal that considers an open-ended cartography for art and its territory.

Christodoulos Panayiotou at Venice BiennaleImage courtesy of Christodoulos Panayiotou, 2015

The exhibition considers how the formal structure of antiquity can be fundamentally interrogated, enabling new spaces of imagination to emerge. Adopting a diversity of strategies, Panayiotou questions how tradition is formed and authorship and authenticity are governed. Through an act of meticulous staging, the artist critiques modernity’s hyperbolic and aspirational fabric and its inconsistent notion of progress.

Christodoulos Panayiotou at Venice Biennale Image courtesy of Christodoulos Panayiotou, 2015

Adopting a multi-disciplinary approach, and returning to central ideas of his research, Panayiotou’s work will manifest in a number of forms: as architecture—floors and walls, as choreographies— of movement and stillness, and as text that is both revealed and concealed. These are not definitive proposals, but open-ended topographies that seek to question the individual’s relationship to the constantly fluctuating act of making history. Memory and memorialisation, historical fragmentation and completion, are in turn central points of exploration within this project.

Christodoulos Panayiotou at Venice BiennaleImage courtesy of Christodoulos Panayiotou, 2015

Panayiotou considers the transformative potential of the human in relation to the rarefied object, and critically explores the role of the readymade in contemporary practice through acts of creation and de-creation. Thus, the structures of economy are explored, materials are activated and their symbolic value is questioned. “Two Days After Forever” is an exhibition that adopts different modes—it sleeps and awakens and embodies different temporalities.

Christodoulos Panayiotou at Venice Biennale Image courtesy of Christodoulos Panayiotou, 2015

The project as such manifests as an anthropology of movement in the pavilion, where histories of illusion and disenchantment, dramaturgy and the Romantic ballet are revisited. These themes will be evidenced through ongoing performances that merge biography with historical imaginaries.

Christodoulos Panayiotou at Venice BiennaleImage courtesy of Christodoulos Panayiotou, 2015

Christodoulos Panayiotou “Two Days After Forever”
at Palazzo Malipiero, Venice
until 22 November 2015

more. www.cyprusinvenice.org

 

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