Perforated City | ITSLIQUID

Perforated City

Art | July 12, 2020 |

Perforated City
Image courtesy of MOCA Taipei

Perforated City
The Museum of Contemporary Art, Taipei
May 23 – August 09, 2020


Approximately one year ago, MOCA Taipei invited me to curate an exhibition themed on space. I immediately thought of the four- or five-story apartment buildings that are rather outmoded and have no elevators, which bring the dynamic relations among time, space, architecture and people into an integrated whole.

Perforated City
Image courtesy of MOCA Taipei

At first, the concept starts from the communal villages of walkup apartments, but the spectrum soon grows to include first old-street villages with one- and two-story buildings, then modern walkup apartments that are four to five stories, and eventually villages in contemporary apartments that are taller and larger. The traffic infrastructure in these villages also expand from small alleys and fire lanes to two-lane streets or even wider roads. Lower height of the architecture signals a closer distance between people as well as higher penetrability and intercommunicability.

Perforated City
Image courtesy of MOCA Taipei

Four- and five-story walkup apartments, especially those with hallways on floors above the ground floor, mark the limit below which the aforesaid qualities can still be maintained. The villages of more advanced apartment buildings with elevators, on the other hand, see a dramatic decrease of penetrability and intercommunicability. When there are wider, larger roads and more, faster traffic going through the villages, these qualities are also affected.

Perforated City
Image courtesy of MOCA Taipei

As the floor area and height of a building grow, the village grows even more enclosed and isolated, and it becomes more unlikely for the residents to interact with each other directly, let alone establish close relationships. In addition, following the inevitable life cycle of architecture as well as the marginalization and consequent decline of an area, the living networks and relationships in these buildings have often withered prematurely in an invisible state long before they could flourish and before these concrete villages really turn into disserted ruins.

Perforated City
Image courtesy of MOCA Taipei

This is the first aspect of “perforation” that is most easily detected in its nearly deteriorated state. Secondly, the idea of “perforation” conveys a more active intention to see through or control-that is, the wide range of relations among all the basically isolated, invisible individuals and families in the large, transparent apartment buildings and the external environment.

Perforated City
Image courtesy of MOCA Taipei

The third aspect is the thinking about the infiltrating, affecting factors: the solid layers of concrete walls can naturally form separation, but they are not able to keep various problems away – such as aging, disabilities, solitude, diseases, epidemics, true or fake messages, progressive development, fashion, collectively emotions, beneficial or inaccurate ideas and policies, vital interest in relation to the neighbors, remote or global industries and their development, disasters or crises – and stop them from penetrating the walls and exert their influences.

Perforated City
Image courtesy of MOCA Taipei

The fourth aspect is about the myriad of forms that can generate interdependence and interconnectability as well as the possibility of mapping out these relations three-dimensionally within the separation enforced by layers of walls, massive information and the disturbances of various influences.

Hai-Ming Huang

more. www.mocataipei.org.tw

Perforated City
Image courtesy of MOCA Taipei
Perforated City
Image courtesy of MOCA Taipei
Perforated City
Image courtesy of MOCA Taipei
Perforated City
Image courtesy of MOCA Taipei

Are you an artist, architect, designer? Would you like to be featured on ITSLIQUID platform? Send an e-mail to info@itsliquid.com or fill the form below

RELATED POSTS


Paweł Althamer, Artur Żmijewski. The…

Art | October 21, 2020

At the exhibition The Ultimate Song by Paweł Althamer and Artur Żmijewski we present a selection of 20 collages created between 2017 and 2019. The artists, both graduates of Grzegorz Kowalski's studio and dedicated to Oskar Hansen's concept of the Open Form, debuted in the 1990s. They have been part of the canon of Polish and world art ever since. They have kept in touch with each other after graduation from the Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw, and they remain friends, working together and presenting joint exhibitions. Read more


Sarah Sza. Night into Day

Art | October 18, 2020

Born in Boston, Massachusetts, Sze currently lives and works in New York. In 1999, the Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain offered her a large solo show. Sarah Sze represented the United States at the Venice Biennale in 2013 and many of her works are held in the collections of prestigious institutions such as The Museum of Modern Art and The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, as well as The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Read more


Olafur Eliasson at MOT

Art | September 11, 2020

“I am holding a small power station in my hand with sunshine I brought from Berlin to Japan,” said Olafur Eliasson at the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo (MOT) in April 2019, as he illuminated his surroundings using a Little Sun lamp - a solar-powered mobile light he created to provide clean, affordable energy to those without access to electricity. MOT is pleased to announce Eliasson’s upcoming solo exhibition Olafur Eliasson: Sometimes the river is the bridge, the Danish-Icelandic artist’s first exhibition in Japan in ten years. Read more


PEDRO REYES. RETURN TO SENDER

Art | September 7, 2020

For his works, Pedro Reyes (b. 1972 in Mexico City) uses architecture, sculpture, video, performance, and participation to promote collective and individual power of action in political, social, ecological, and educational situations. Read more


Sign up for our Newsletter.

Enter your email to receive our latest updates!