Zoe Robertson’s oversized flockOmania creations meld jewellery with performance | ITSLIQUID

Zoe Robertson’s oversized flockOmania creations meld jewellery with performance

About, Design | January 5, 2017 |

Zoe Robertson's oversized flockOmania creations meld jewellery with performanceImage courtesy of The Cass Bank Gallery

Zoe Robertson’s oversized flockOmania creations meld jewellery with performance

The Cass, London Metropolitan University presents ‘FlockOmania’, an exhibition created by jewellery artist and Cass alumna Zoe Robertson, on show at the Cass Bank Gallery from 9 to 26 January 2017. ‘FlockOmania’ showcases wearable objects that explore the interrelationship between jewellery and performance, blurring the lines between these two apparently unrelated worlds, and involving sound, film, dance and photography in the process.

 

Zoe Robertson's oversized flockOmania creations meld jewellery with performanceImage courtesy of The Cass Bank Gallery

 

Fifteen sculptural jewellery objects meticulously handmade using a mix of traditional craft skills, in combination with industrial processes and new technology, will be on display, creating an unusual setting for a performance-based exploration between objects, the body and the space. Robertson created ‘FlockOmania’ in response to a collaborative relationship with dance artists Dr Natalie Garrett Brown and Amy Voris. Their background in contemporary dance, movement improvisation and site based performance provided the catalyst for this body of work. The result is theatrically-sized jewellery that emphasises and explores themes relating to the scale and movement of the body.

 

Zoe Robertson's oversized flockOmania creations meld jewellery with performanceImage courtesy of The Cass Bank Gallery

 

Originally conceived as a solo exhibition in 2015, the exhibition has grown beyond the original concept, evolving into many different forms: an exhibition, installation, mobile performance and into performance lab workshops. ‘FlockOmania’ challenges the traditional display and use of jewellery. The objects break away from static display and are used to create a space referred to by Robertson, Garrett Brown and Voris as ‘a laboratory of making’. In this space dance artists improvise movement and encourage audience participation. During the exhibition at The Cass, there will be two afternoon dance interventions on 13 and 18 January and a private view finale on 20 January).


The Cass Bank Gallery, London
From January 9 to January 26, 2017

 

more. zoerobertson.co.uk

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